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Popov and the Popov cross

The settlement of Popov, Pfaffengrün in German, was founded even earlier than the nearby Jáchymov. According to some sources, it was already in the 13th century, when it is mentioned as the property of the Teplá Premonstratensian monastery. In the following period the village was divided into Upper and Lower Popov. After World War II, the last German inhabitants left the settlement and the village was razed to the ground. Today, the only reminders of the existence of the settlement are the remains of some buildings, the torso of the chapel and the information boards you will see on the way to the viewpoint.

The ruins of the houses are located in Dolni Popov. In Horní Popov, apart from the remains of the chapel and the fence, there is nothing left. According to information, the houses in Horní Popov were dismantled during uranium mining and taken to the former USSR together with the mined material. In Dolni Popov there are the remains of about 5 buildings including the former pub and a small pond, in the upper part there is a memorable ash tree growing on the foundations of the old house.

An interesting feature of this extinct village was the production of goat cheese. The villagers kept goats in every cottage and made delicious cheese according to a secret recipe known only to them. Thanks to a common agreement and a united sale, the village was enriched.

There are several legends connected to the history of the Popovsky Cross. According to one of them, the cross was erected here because of a pilgrim who once got lost in the Erzgebirge forests. The cross, visible from a great distance, was supposed to help him find his way. The wooden cross stands at an altitude of 752 metres on a rock cliff, and you can see the towns of Ostrov and Karlovy Vary or the peaks of the Doupov Mountains and the Slavkov Forest right in the palm of your hand.

There are several legends connected to the history of the Popovsky Cross. According to one of them, the cross was erected here because of a pilgrim who once got lost in the Erzgebirge forests. The cross, visible from a great distance, was supposed to help him find his way. The wooden cross stands at an altitude of 752 metres on a rock cliff, and you can see the towns of Ostrov and Karlovy Vary or the peaks of the Doupov Mountains and the Slavkov Forest right in the palm of your hand.